Selecting The Right Caster

HOW TO CHOOSE THE PROPER CASTER & WHEEL FOR YOUR NEEDS

An unlimited combination of variables determine the combination of components that a caster needs for a given task. The following describe variables to consider when choosing the caster that is right for your use.

 

Load Weight Load Weight: The higher the the load weight, the larger and more dense the wheel required. Gross weight of a truck/dolly should be divided by the number of casters/wheels on which the weight is distributed
Floor conditions affect caster and wheel performance. To view which wheels perform best on which flooring type, explore our wheel type page. Floor Conditions: Floor conditions affect caster and wheel performance. To view which wheels perform best on which flooring type, explore our wheel type page.
Each wheel has its strengths and weaknesses in unusual conditions. To view which wheels perform best in which condition, explore our wheel type page. Unusual Conditions: Each wheel has its strengths and weaknesses in unusual conditions. To view which wheels perform best in which condition, explore our wheel type page.
Extreme heat or cold is a problem for most casters and wheels. To view a recommended operating temperature range for various caster wheels, explore our wheel type page. Extreme Climates: Extreme heat or cold is a problem for most casters and wheels. To view a recommended operating temperature range for various caster wheels, explore our wheel type page.
The larger the wheel diameter, and the harder the wheel material, the easier the wheel will roll. Roller bearings carry heavier loads. Ball bearings roll easier but carry lesser loads. Rolling ease is also affected by environmental and application conditions. For example, a CC Apex wheel will work well rolling over thresholds, but a phenolic wheel may not. Rolling Ease: The larger the wheel diameter, and the harder the wheel material, the easier the wheel will roll. Roller bearings carry heavier loads. Ball bearings roll easier but carry lesser loads. Rolling ease is also affected by environmental and application conditions. For example, a CC Apex wheel will work well rolling over thresholds, but a phenolic wheel may not.

CASTER PLACEMENT FOR CARTS

Two Rigid, Two Swivel - Most common and affordable arrangement - For straight movement and/or travelling long distances - Recommended for heavy or medium loads - Recommended use depends upon the weight capacity of the casters selected Two Rigid, Two Swivel:
- Most common and affordable arrangement
- For straight movement and/or travelling long distances
- Recommended for heavy or medium loads
- Recommended use depends upon the weight capacity of the casters selected
Tilt Mounting - Most economical positioning of casters - Limited to lighter loads - Prime performance occurs when load wheels are 1/8" taller than the balance wheels - Not recommended for ramp use Tilt Mounting:
- Most economical positioning of casters
- Limited to lighter loads
- Prime performance occurs when load wheels are 1/8" taller than the balance wheels
- Not recommended for ramp use
Diamond Mounting - Two rigid and two swivel - Diamond placement provides increased maneuverability - Not recommended for ramp use Diamond Mounting:
- Two rigid and two swivel
- Diamond placement provides increased maneuverability
- Not recommended for ramp use
Four Swivel: - Optimal caster configuration for applications requiring sideways movement - Most flexible arrangement Four Swivel:
- Optimal caster configuration for applications requiring sideways movement
- Most flexible arrangement
Four Swivel Two Rigid: - Ideal caster configuration for heavy loads and lengthy travel - Two rigid casters help allocate and reduce the load on the swivel casters Four Swivel, Two Rigid:
- Ideal caster configuration for heavy loads and lengthy travel
- Two rigid casters help allocate and reduce the load on the swivel casters